ISTE 2013- Exploring Frontiers: Flipping the Classroom for English Language Learners

ESL Techies is presenting at ISTE 2013 in San Antonio, Texas!

We just arrived in San Antonio for the 2013 ISTE Conference and are really looking forward to sharing our ideas with our workshop participants this Monday.

We’ve written in this blog before about how the flipped instructional model is particularly useful for English language learners. See our post from February 2012 Flipping the Classroom for ELLs.

Essentially, face to face lectures are replaced with at-home video tutorials or screencasts. This gives our ELLs lots of time to view and review the lecture without losing valuable time in the classroom.

When the student returns to class, the information from the video is applied to a project or learning task. This gives ELLs more time to synthesize their learning and practice language with their peers. Teachers become facilitators in this interactive, student-centered environment.

Another obvious advantage is that using multimedia when delivering instruction for ELLs, helps them build background knowledge, master vocabulary, infer meaning, as well as extend their knowledge of a topic.

Flipping the classroom does require careful preparation. Recording screencasts and other types of video tutorials takes time, but they can be scaffolded and differentiated for the unique language needs of ESL students.

Whether teachers make their own screencasts or use pre-made videos in a flipped classroom, the teachers and students are ultimately rewarded with more time to explore, interact and learn.

For this year’s workshop we will be working with four apps for the iPad that make flipping the classroom easier for teachers:

Educreations, Videolicious, Nearpod and Edmodo.

Other Flipped Resources:

Bergman, J. & Sams, A. (2012) Flip your classroom: reach every student in every class every day

The Flipped Learning Network

flippedlearning.org

The Center for Teaching + Learning, University of Texas at Austin:

http://ctl.utexas.edu/teaching/flipping_a_class/what_is_flipped

 

 

 

 

 

Discovery Education and the iPad: Long Island Day of Discovery

Today we had the opportunity to present at the Discovery Education Day of Discovery Conference.  We explored techniques for building a mobile learning environment and ways to use digital media in creating content on the iPad.  It was exciting to demonstrate how digital media and web 2.0 tools remove boundaries and promote academic achievement for ELLs.  The iPad and other tablet computers can support the use of Discovery Education streaming and allow ELLs to access academic content in a whole new way.

We enjoyed engaging with those educators working hard with ELLs and all struggling learners.  Here are just a few recommended apps that were shared during our session:

  • Roadshow – Collect web videos and play them back anytime
  • Language Builder – A rich environment for improving language development
  • ScreenChomp – Sharing tools used to create a sharable, replay-able video
  • ShowMe – Record voice-over whiteboard tutorials and share them online
  • Videolicious – Create a video combining videos, photos, music, and stories
  • Audioboo – Create audio and post to your own account on the web
  • SlideShark – View and share PowerPoint presentations on the iPad

 

 

 

Simple Digital Solutions in Complicated Times

Monitoring Student Work with Discovery Education’s Assignment Manager

by Heather Parris-Fitzpatrick

Nowadays it is more important then ever before to document and monitor student progress consistently. Fortunately, there are educational websites that make life a little easier for our beleaguered teachers.

One of my favorite sites for managing classes and creating interactive learning experiences for ELLs is Discovery Education Streaming. In addition to the free teacher resources (hint: they are easily found by scrolling all the way down to the bottom of the homepage), school districts can purchase a subscription to the site.

Discoveryeducation.com provides subscribers with a simple solution for monitoring student progress.

After building assignments, quizzes, writing prompts, or science assessments in My Builder Tools, teachers can keep track and document student work using Assignment Manager. Users can select a tab to view results in three different ways: by class, by student or by URL or assignment code.

Viewing assignments by class is useful to see how many students have submitted or completed the task. Teachers can edit the assignment or due date and determine the progress the class is making as a whole.

Viewing by student allows a teacher to determine whether a particular student requires remediation. Teachers can assign extra practice or decide to delete student attempts on the assignment.

You can also view assignments according to url or assignment code. This may be useful when an assignment has been given to several different classes and you would like to view all class results together.

In addition to simply viewing, teachers may decide to export the results to an excel file so that it can be stored locally and shared with others. The excel file can be imported into a school-based student data system or printed for a parent teacher conference or a student portfolio.

That reminds me, e-portfolios are another great tool for student assessment. More on that next time!